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Sheet Metal Marking

Specimens, prepared with the ERICHSEN Sheet Metal Marking Instrument, Model 190, provide extensive information about their behaviour during subsequent deformation. The degree of strain in the form of elongation or compression can be clearly seen by the distortion of the pattern of the measuring grid and can be measured numerically.


A forming limit curve is generally recorded by applying a pattern of circles and lines to the sheet metal blanks prior to the forming process. Due to the tension applied to the sheet metal the circular marks deform to ellipses, the main axes of which represent the true strain in major and minor direction. After the forming process, the "deformed" line patterns are measured using measuring magnifying glasses, measuring micro-scopes or flexible measuring strips. In order to comply with today's requirements, the characteristic values of sheet metal materials must be determined precisely, reproducibly and efficiently.By using optical measurement systems.

 

Product Example:

Sheet Metal Marking Instrument, Model 190

Specimens made of ferrous and non-ferrous sheet metal and prepared with the ERICHSEN Sheet Metal Marking Instrument, Model 190, provide extensive information about their behaviour during subsequent deformation. The measuring grid applied to the specimen electro-chemically, indicates in all parts of the work piece the direction and magnitude of the strain produced. The degree of strain in the form of elongation or compression can be clearly seen by the distortion of the pattern of the measuring grid and can be measured numerically.